Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

Court Records

State office

Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

CJIS - Criminal History Access Unit

1430 Maryland Ave E St Paul, MN 55106

Records Available:

Minnesota criminal records are available to the public in both limited and complete records formats. In order for a citizen to view another person’s complete criminal record, notarized consent must be obtained. Individuals may request their personal criminal records, as can authorized state and employers. Without consent, public criminal records include all adult convictions for misdemeanors and felonies and sentencing less than 15 years old.

Minnesota  Court Record Availability

State statutes require all law enforcement agencies to report juvenile felony and gross misdemeanor arrests, and adult felony, gross misdemeanor, enhanced gross misdemeanor and targeted misdemeanor arrests to BCA. Other misdemeanors are sometimes reported

Access to Minnesota Court Records

Retrieving Records

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA) provides access to public criminal records through its online database. These records, which include the subject’s offense, court of conviction, date of conviction, and sentencing information, may be viewed by anyone. Access to public criminal records is also available on public computer terminals at the BCA office in St. Paul. Record subjects, criminal justice agencies, and authorized representatives may request copies of private criminal records using the BCA’s Informed Consent Form. This form must be signed by the record subject and notarized. Requests may be mailed to the BCA.


Individuals may receive copies of their own complete criminal history, including private and public data, for $8, payable by check or money order. There is a $15 fee to request another person’s full criminal history record. There is no fee to view records online or at the BCA Office; however, there is an $8 fee for a printed copy.

Years Available

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension provides access to public criminal records for 15 years after the individual has completed the sentence for a specific offense.